Oloron-Sainte-Marie

The Gave d'Aspe in Oloron-Sainte-Marie

On our first full day in Béarn, we decided to spend the afternoon in the nearby city of Oloron-Sainte-Marie, the capital of the Haut Béarn region. The town is situated around the point where the Gave d’Aspe and the Gave d’Ossau meet, and has been a major trading hub in the region since the 11th century.

Our first port of call in the small city was the Quartier Notre Dame, and on our way to the quarter, we passed a plaque commemorating 19 young resistance fighters who were captured and sent to concentration camps in May 1943 where they died from hunger. It was a sobering and poignant reminder of the terrible impact the Second World War had on families in the region.

Continuing our walk, we came to the Église-Notre-Dame (above, left) and when we stepped inside, we found the place deserted. Wandering around the church, which was painted a pale cream and light grey, I was struck by how pretty the sanctuary was. Its walls and ceiling were delicately painted in shades of red, purple, green and gold (above, right), and its pink and purple stained glass windows were also delightfully pretty. It was a beautiful, peaceful space, if a little shabby and neglected in parts as some of the paintwork desperately needed touching up.

The Gave d'Ossau in Oloron-Saint-Marie

From the church, we made our way towards the Hotel de Ville and followed the signs to the Quartier Confluence. The path took us over the two rivers, the Aspe and the Ossau (above), and walking over the bridges that spanned them, we got a real sense of the potential combined power of these two rivers as we watched gallons of water pouring down the rivers and over the weirs.

We continued along the path until we reached the town centre again, which was pretty much deserted. We decided to stop for coffee in the only café we could find open where we were rudely and brusquely told we couldn’t only order drinks and had to order food, despite the fact that other people were sitting outside with nothing more than coffees.

With nothing else to see and all the other cafés and shops closed, we headed back to the car. On the way out of town a car beeped its horn at us angrily when we stopped at a red traffic light and then overtook us at speed, with the passenger sticking two fingers up at us as they drove past.

Gave d'Ossau in Oloron-Saint-Marie

The incident rather summed up my feelings about Oloron-Sainte-Marie – I didn’t like it. There wasn’t much to see in the city, it was oddly deserted and the few people we came across weren’t particularly pleasant. Needless to say, during our week in Béarn, we only revisited the city to go to the supermarket and otherwise avoided it like the plague. Easily the most disappointing place we visited in Béarn – everywhere else, luckily, was lovely!

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Béarn

Artouste Dam and Lac de Fabreges in the Pyrenees

In the shadow of the Pyrenees, lies the ancient region of Béarn. A wild, untamed land dominated by its stunning scenery, it’s an area of myths and legends, and has an otherworldly, spiritual feel. It’s a collection of rugged, impossibly tall mountains, and lush green forests and fields, and is home to an abundance of wildlife, including magnificent birds of prey and adorably cute marmots.

The village of Eaux-Chaudes in the Ossau Valley in the Pyrenees

Having spent childhood holidays on the eastern and western fringes of the Pyrenees, we decided it was time to explore the central part of France’s natural border with Spain and booked a gîte for a week in Béarn.

Henri IV's chateau in Pau

Our week was spent following the pilgrim trail to Bétharram and Lourdes, and sightseeing in the region’s capital, Pau, home to Henri IV’s elegant chateau (above). We also spent time touring the wine-growing areas of Madiran and Jurançon, going underground at the Grottes de Bétharram, and of course, exploring the Pyrenees themselves in the Ossau Valley.

A wooden board with cheese and bread

Given the varied, and at times, imposing terrain, the region’s food revolves around hardy mountain animals. Goat’s and ewe’s milk cheeses are abundant, the local standout being the delicious Ossau-Iraty, which is made using unpasteurised ewe’s milk and has a slightly nutty taste. We were lucky enough to be staying near a fabulous fromagerie and had great fun picking out cheeses. Tomme de Pyrenees and a wonderful blue goat’s cheese from the region were among our favourites.

Grapes growing on the vine at Aydie on the Madiran route du vin

With all the great cheese the region produces, it stands to reason that it also needs some good wine to help wash it all down, and luckily, the Madiran and Jurançon regions provide just that.

We spent a day driving around the small towns and villages of the Madiran region on the look out for vineyards producing the robust, earthy red and ended up sampling (and subsequently buying) a number of bottles in the local wine co-op. I’d never heard of Jurançon, a white wine produced in the region around Pau, before visiting Béarn, and being a fussy white wine drinker, I was surprised to find I rather liked the dry version, Jurançon Sec.

Lourdes photographed from the town's chateau

Béarn might not be top of most people’s list of places to visit in France, but I found a region steeped in history with excellent food and drink, lots to see and do, and of course, breathtaking scenery. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed Lourdes (above), Pau (the shopping’s superb) and Bétharram, and all in all, I loved my week in the region. If you’re looking for somewhere to go in France that’s a little off the beaten track with unspoilt landscapes, great hiking and a fairly traditional way of life, you can’t go far wrong with Béarn.

Poitiers

Cathedrale Saint Pierre in Poitiers

With its ancient churches, numerous bookstores and fantastic shops, Poitiers is one of my favourite French cities. Its medieval centre is a delight to wander around, a maze of winding streets featuring charming timber-clad buildings and distractingly tempting food shops and cafés.

When we arrived in the city, we decided to take a self-guided walking tour around its medieval centre, which took in most of the city’s sights. After a quick cup of coffee near the university, we set off down the Rue Gambetta, stopping to look in the many shops that took our fancy – and there were quite a few! – along the way.

Our first destination was the Church of Saint Hilary the Great. The church is a short walk beyond the city centre, tucked away in a residential area, and as I followed the map to the church, I had to repeatedly reassure everyone that we were going the right way.

The church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and was built in the 11th century to honour the first Bishop of Poitiers, St Hilaire. The Romanesque church is a striking, weathered building, the highlight inside being its beautiful high vaulted ceiling, and I was glad we’d made the detour to go to the church as it was well worth seeing.

The back of the Palais de Justice in Poitiers

From the church, we walked back towards the city centre, where we passed the impressive town hall and carried on walking in the direction of the Palace of Justice. The palace was once the home of the counts and dukes of Aquitaine, and counts the legendary Eleanor of Aquitaine among its former inhabitants.

Its renowned for its dining hall, the Salle des Pas Perdus (the hall of the lost footsteps), which was commissioned by Eleanor of Aquitaine in the late 12th century and is so-called because it’s said to be so big you can’t hear any footsteps within. We weren’t able to go inside on the day we visited, so we stopped to admire the stunning view of the back of the palace instead (above).

Baptistery of St Jean in Poitiers

We then made our way to the Rue Jean-Jaures and carried on down the street to the Baptistery of St John (above). The Merovingian baptistery is said to be the oldest church in France and dates back to the 4th century. We had a quick look inside and found it to be a fascinating, unusual place with amazing medieval frescoes on the walls and random stone sarcophagi dotted around the place.

Saint Pierre Cathedral in Poitiers

From the baptistery, we headed over to the city’s cathedral, the Cathédrale de Saint Pierre (above). The impressive 12th century cathedral was commissioned by Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, and was built on the site of a ruined Roman basilica. It’s a massive, imposing structure from the outside, while inside it’s an elegant space with creamy stone walls and a high vaulted ceiling.

An ornate doorway at the Saint Pierre Cathedral in Poitiers

We spent ages looking around the cathedral, admiring its many notable features including its 13th century wooden choir stalls, its bright, colourful stained glass windows and its grand 18th century organ. I was particularly taken by the intricate carvings above the main doors (above).

Having looked around the cathedral, we headed back to the town centre, passing some quirky and intriguing shops on the Rue de la Cathédrale and the large Notre-Dame la Grande church as we went.

Before leaving, I was keen to visit a large bookshop I’d passed earlier in the day on the Rue Gambetta, Gilbert Joseph. I’m a massive bibliophile and always on the look out for some new (French) children’s history books I can read, so I was keen to check out their selection. Despite having a very thorough rummage – much to everyone else’s consternation – I couldn’t find what I was looking for.

With its long and varied history, characterful buildings and excellent shopping, Poitiers is a wonderful city and I could easily have spent longer there. In fact, I probably could have done with a whole day just to browse in all the interesting shops I passed. The food shops in particular looked very enticing, especially the chocolate shops and patisseries, and I’d probably need a month to eat everything that took my fancy.  I thoroughly enjoyed my day trip to the city, so much so if I were ever to move to a French city, Poitiers would be at the top of my list.

Coulon

The bridge over the canal in Coulon

The tree-lined canals and rivers of the Marais Poitevin are renowed for their idyllic beauty, and as they were only an hour or so’s drive from Parthenay, we were keen to see this fabled part of France for ourselves.

The Marais Poitevin is a huge area of marshland stretching over some 970 sq km and the part we were keen to see was the La Venise Verte, or the Green Venice, so-called because of the green duck weed that covers the waterways. Our destination was Coulon, the unofficial capital of the region. As usual we arrived at lunchtime and after a quick lunch, we set about exploring the area.

A cafe, shop and a church in the centre of Coulon

The small village of Coulon is listed as one of le plus beaux villages de France (most beautiful villages in France) and it’s a charming place, if a little touristy. There are a number of shops and restaurants that are clearly geared towards visiting tourists with shops selling local ‘artisan’ produce and souvenirs, such as fridge magnets. As a result I didn’t find it quite as appealing as some of the other plus beaux villages I’ve visited such as Monpazier and Angles sur l’Anglin.

Boats lined up along the canal at Coulon

Having looked around the village, we made our way down to the river and the heart of the Green Venice. The Sèvre-Niortaise River runs through the village, and down by the water’s edge you can explore the surrounding network of canals and rivers by renting punts or taking a guided boat tour. The river bank is a pretty place with lots of characterful buildings overlooking the river, as well as numerous willow and poplar trees lining the banks.

Bridge over the canal in Coulon

We strolled along the river bank for quite a way into the surrounding countryside, enjoying the water’s peaceful and relaxing charms, and admiring the attractive buildings we passed along the way. Having ambled for quite a while down the river bank, we turned back towards Coulon where we joined a guided boat trip along the river. The boat trip was pleasant and scenic, but nothing spectacular.

L'Eglise de Sainte-Trinite in Coulon

After our boat ride, we strolled back through the village, stopping to look inside the old church in the centre of the village, the Eglise de Sainte-Trinité (above). Our day trip to Coulon was pleasant enough, but if I’m honest, I wasn’t blown away by the experience and I was left feeling rather underwhelmed. France’s Green Venice is a little touristy for my tastes and nowhere near as spectacular as its reputation and name suggests – it’s perfectly nice, but no more than that.

Angles-sur-l’Anglin

View of the cliff-top fortress and a mill on the river bank in Angles-sur-l'Anglin

One of the plus beaux villages de France (most beautiful villages in France), the village of Angles-sur-l’Anglin is, as its label suggests, ridiculously pretty. Situated around the idyllic River Anglin, the charming village boasts picture-perfect medieval buildings, breathtaking views and a ruined cliff-top castle. It’s also home to a series of 14,000-year-old Paleolithic cave sculptures.

The medieval streets in Angles-sur-l'Anglin

We arrived in Angles-sur-l’Anglin at lunchtime and after a spot of lunch, spent a couple of hours ambling around the village’s winding, narrow streets, admiring the attractive architecture, taking lots of photos and looking in the occasional shop we passed along the way.

The village was quiet when we visited, which added to its idyllic charms. It also meant I could take my time playing with the settings on my camera and have a little fun with my photography as I didn’t have to worry about people stepping into my shot.

Angles-sur-l'Anglin fortress

With it’s dramatic position high on the cliff overlooking the River Anglin, one building in the village stands out from all the rest – the castle. The ruined fortress, which was originally built between the 12th and 15th centuries for the bishops of Poitiers, is now in such a precarious state it’s closed to the public for safety reasons. But you can still look around the outside, which is what we did after walking around the centre of the village.

The castle is located in a strategic position between the ancient regions of Berry, Poitou and Touraine, which were hotly contested by the French and the English during the Middle Ages. When we were up at the castle, it was easy to see why the bishops of Poitiers would build a fortress here as it’s elevated position makes it a great place from which to detect an invading army.

After seeing what we could of the ruined castle, we made our way to the highest point on the cliff, which is home to the Saint Pierre Chapel. The tiny, unassuming and abandoned-looking chapel was closed, so we couldn’t look inside, but the views over the village, the castle and the river were fantastic and well-worth the climb.

River Anglin in Angles-sur-l'Anglin

From the chapel, we strolled back down the hill, past the castle, to the river. There we ambled along the picturesque river bank, stopping to look at an old water mill along the way. After a short walk, we turned back and made our way to Roc-aux-Sorciers.

Roc-aux-Sorciers, or Sorcerers’ Rock as it’s known in English, is a rock shelter featuring 14,000-year-old cave sculptures of animals. The sculptures are closed to the public for conservation reasons, but the site is home to an interpretation centre where you can view replicas of the sculptures and find out more about their Paleolithic creators.

Unfortunately when we got to Roc-aux-Sorciers, we found we’d made that rookie mistake of not checking the opening times before we visited and the centre was closed. We might not have seen the replicas of the Paleolithic sculptures, but we nevertheless had a lovely day out in Angles-sur-l’Anglin, which more than lived up to its billing as one of France’s most beautiful villages.

Montreuil-Bellay

Chateau de Montreuil-Bellay in France

As regular readers to my blog likely know by now, I love a castle, and if there’s one close by when I’m travelling, I have to visit it. During our stay in Parthenay, our hosts had told us the best castle nearby was in the town of Montreuil-Bellay, so that’s where we headed on our second day in the region.

When we arrived in Montreuil-Bellay, we found the castle was closed for lunch, so we found a café where we had a bite to eat and then spent some time wandering around the town until 2pm when the castle was set to reopen. The town of Montreuil-Bellay has a long history as it’s strategically placed between the historic areas of Anjou, Poitou and Touraine (all former Plantagenet strongholds). As a result, it’s home to lots of attractive, old buildings.

The 15th century St John's Gate in Montreuil-Bellay

We spent a pleasant half hour or so ambling around the town’s streets, admiring the old buildings and fortifications (including the 15th century St John’s Gate, above) and looking in the odd shop, before making our way back to the castle. The huge, beautiful castle is still inhabited so it can only be visited by guided tour at certain times throughout the day.

Chateau de Montreuil-Bellay in France

The current castle was built between the 13th and 15th centuries, but there’s been a castle on the site since the 11th century. It has quite the storied history, too. Its moat sheltered starving peasants during the Hundred Years War between England and France, women thought to be sympathetic to the royalist cause were imprisoned here during the revolution of the 1790s, and it served as a hospital for wounded soldiers during the First World War.

View of the River Thouet from the gardens at the Chateau de Montreuil-Bellay

After buying our tickets, we had time to spare before our tour began so we set off to explore the castle’s gardens and ramparts. The castle, which overlooks the River Thouet, boasts 13 towers and some 650m of ramparts, and I had great fun climbing the garden’s towers, exploring the ramparts, from which I had fantastic views of the river below, and strolling around the landscaped grounds.

The gardens were really pretty with beautifully manicured lawns and hedges, and flower beds filled with red, pink and white flowers. There’s also an enormous, elegant chapel. After spending a good half hour roaming the grounds and taking lots of photos, it was finally time for our guided tour.

The guided tour, which takes you around the castle’s ground floor and the cellars, was carried out in French and English, and lasted just under an hour. Among the rooms on display were the music room, dining room and the Duchess of Longueville’s bedroom, as well as the impressive medieval kitchen and the huge cellars where they used to make wine. We weren’t allowed to take any photos inside, hence the lack of indoor pics, but the tour was interesting and our guide knowledgeable.

Montreuil-Bellay is a beautiful château and an interesting place to spend an hour or so, but I’m not sure it was worth the hour or so drive there and back from Parthenay. Unfortunately, you can’t see much of the castle other than those few rooms on the ground floor and the cellars, which is understandable when people still live there, but it felt as though it was lacking something, especially given its long and fascinating history. It’s lovely and all, but if I’m honest, it’s not the most interesting castle I’ve visited in France.

Parthenay

River Thouet in Parthenay

A couple of years ago, I spent a week just outside the fortified town of Parthenay in the Nouvelles-Aquitaine region of France. The town is situated in a bend in the River Thouet and is a charming, attractive place, with timber-clad houses, a ruined castle, a number of impressive medieval gates and striking churches.

The medieval streets with timber-clad houses in Parthenay

Soon after arriving, we spent a happy couple of hours exploring the citadel, wandering through the old town’s hilly, winding medieval streets and enjoying the views of the river. We went on a circuitous route through the old town centre, ambling past lots of rickety-looking timber-clad houses, not quite sure where we were going, going up this road, then that, and seeing where we ended up.

Looking up at the Porte Saint-Jacques in Parthenay

Along the way, we came upon the impressive Porte Saint-Jacques (above) where we decided to stop and climb to the top of the tower, admiring the great views over the town and the river. From there, we continued on, making our way down to the river bank and following the path along the river to the castle. The river walk was pretty and peaceful – the only other people we met along the way were a few dog walkers.

Parthenay’s castle was originally built in the 11th century, then expanded in the 13th and 15th centuries. Now much of it lies in ruins with only parts of three of its nine towers remaining. We spent a little time exploring what remained of the ramparts and the towers, before making our way back up to the town.

The water features in the medieval garden in Parthenay

We carried on walking through the narrow, cobbled streets until we came across a lovely medieval garden. It was only small, with a little water feature, an orchard and lots of herbs growing, but it was a relaxing spot and I was glad we stumbled across it. By now, we’d pretty much walked around the whole of the medieval part of Parthenay, so we stopped off at a café for a well-deserved rest and a drink. Our stroll around the town was really enjoyable and a great way to start our week-long break in the region.

Château de Biron

I’m a little obsessed with castles, which means whenever I go anywhere, especially in Europe, I’m on the lookout for a castle to visit. Luckily, the magnificent Château de Biron was only a few kilometres from our base in Monpazier, which meant there was no way I was leaving the Dordogne without visiting this incredible fortress.

Perched high on a hill and dominating the surrounding landscape, it’s impossible to miss Château de Biron. Built in the 12th century, the castle boasts commanding views over the surrounding countryside and is an impressive sight. After it was damaged during the Hundred Years War between France and England, the castle was restored in the 15th century, resulting in a curious blend of architectural styles. It was owned by the Gontaut-Biron family, one of the four baronies of the Périgord, until the early 20th century.

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When we arrived at the castle, we walked through the gates into a large grassy courtyard and having paid for our tickets, were free to wander about as we pleased. Our first port of call was the chapel (above). The chapel features high-vaulted ceilings and stained glass windows, which in the bright sunlight left a colourful twinkling pattern on the stone floor, as well as the tombs of a couple of prominent members of the Gontaut-Biron family.

We then walked across the courtyard to have a look around the main part of the castle. The castle is huge and I enjoyed wandering aimlessly around it – up and down the stone staircases and going inside all the different rooms. The castle is largely unfurnished, but it was nevertheless an impressive sight, and I strolled around admiring the stonework and the intriguing mix of architectural styles.

One of my favourite rooms was the kitchen, which was enormous. But I also enjoyed walking across the ramparts between the various towers and taking in the gorgeous views over the adjoining village of Biron and the surrounding countryside. We explored every possible nook and cranny of the castle, and it was great fun.

Having spent a good hour or so exploring all there was to see, we made our way back down the hill towards Biron. On the way, we stopped inside the chapel under the castle, which is home to a small arts and crafts market. The market was fantastic with some lovely, unusual products for sale, and I ended up buying a little leather coin purse and my father bought me a beautiful silver bracelet.

By now it was lunchtime, so we had a quick look around Biron – which is a quaint, pretty little village – then stopped off for lunch in the local auberge. Château de Biron is a great place to spend an hour or two. Sometimes these massive castles you can see for miles turn out to be a disappointment when you visit, but Château de Biron’s interior turned out to be just as impressive as the exterior.

Sarlat le Caneda

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To the north of the Dordogne lies the pretty town of Sarlat le Caneda. Home to an abundance of picturesque medieval and renaissance buildings, the town is so renowned for its attractive architecture, it’s one of the most popular tourist spots in the region.

On arriving in Sarlat, we headed straight to the most photogenic part – the old town centre. There we walked around the maze of narrow cobbled streets and alleyways, admiring the beautiful buildings around us, and paying particular attention to the buildings’ intricate and eye-catching details such as turrets, carvings, and arched doors and windows.

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Sarlat is a foodie town and we were lucky enough to visit on a Wednesday, one of its two market days (the other being Saturday), when its narrow, winding streets are filled with stalls selling fresh produce such as fruits and vegetables, sausages, meats, cheeses and more. We spent quite a bit of time wandering around the food stalls, then stopped by the large covered market that’s filled with yet more food stalls, where I bought some lovely little macarons.

Having thoroughly checked out all the food stalls, we made our way to the Manoir de Gisson, a curious little museum housed in a couple of attractive townhouses that once belonged to high-ranking members of the Sarlat nobility. On going inside, we were greeted by strange and interesting artefacts, as well as some grisly and very painful looking torture instruments.

We carried on through the museum, which then turned into a tour of the living quarters showcasing how the rich townsfolk lived during the medieval and renaissance eras. The museum isn’t very big so it didn’t take long to see it all, but I did leave a little bemused by the two very distinct, contrasting sections. It’s the only museum I’ve been to that combines plushly-decorated living quarters with torture instruments and unusual curiosities.

By now we were getting hungry, so we stopped for lunch in one of the many cafes lining the town’s squares. The food was good, but nothing special, and tummies sated we headed up towards the main street where we carried on admiring the architecture, and popping in and out of the many shops.

As pretty as Sarlat is, I didn’t love it. I found it a little too touristy for my tastes and felt it was on that dangerous cusp of beginning to cater so much to tourists that it loses the charms that made it special in the first place. That being said, if you’re in the region, it’s worth visiting (for now) to see what the fuss is about – just make sure you visit on market day and take advantage of all the wonderful produce on sale.

We’re all going on a boar hunt

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Soon after arriving in the Dordogne, I found a little trail that led from our country gite to Monpazier. Despite being rather untrodden in parts, the trail was a great little 40-minute shortcut to Monpazier taking us through some woods, passed a little stream, a number of farms, and finally, up a hill to the town on top.

Having successfully navigated this walking trail, I’d noticed another trail leading from our gite towards the town of Biron, a few miles away. Biron is home to a grand chateau (above), so I decided to see if this trail turned out to be just as good as the one to Monpazier. My mother, worried at the thought of me hiking through the unknown French countryside by myself, decided to come with me.

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We set off along the path at the bottom of the garden along a narrow ledge that led into the surrounding woods. We clambered over the various brambles and branches lying in our way, winding through the forest until we came out by a field in a neighbouring farm. We tramped across the field to a nearby road, then followed it for a bit until we came to a bend. Instead of continuing along the road, we turned down a path into a big patch of woodland.

The path was wide and clearly marked underfoot. It was a hot and sunny day, and so far we hadn’t come across another living soul. We followed the path deeper and deeper into the woods, when suddenly we heard loud barking. Now I’m a little uncomfortable around dogs, especially large dogs, as is my mother. The noise made us a little jittery as it sounded as though there were lots of dogs roaming the woods, but we carried on regardless.

A few moments later we heard a gunshot. By now, we were spooked and my mother suggested we head back. As we turned around and started walking, an old man appeared carrying a shotgun gesturing to us to continue through the woods, seemingly telling us, “It’s fine, there’s nothing to worry about.”

A little bemused as to what was going on, we followed the man’s directions and headed back into the woods. Soon we heard more dogs and more gunshots; we also met another man with a shotgun. At this point, the penny dropped that there was a hunt going on in the woods.

As we continued, we passed yet more hunters, dogs and even a van – and as we walked past the van, we could clearly hear something rattling around inside. We walked through the woods, intrigued by the activity around us, and as we reached the other side came upon another van with a woman standing beside it.

Using my best French, I asked her what was going on and she told us they were hunting boar. In recent years there’s been an explosion of wild boar in France with more than two million roaming the French countryside. The animals destroy crops, breed like rabbits and are responsible for a high number of car accidents, so for the past seven years there’s been a national control plan in place urging hunters and farmers to keep their numbers down.

By now fully clued up on what we’d unwittingly stumbled upon, we thanked the woman and carried on down the path to Biron. We crossed a large field and came out onto a road, surrounded on either side by woodland. As we wandered down the road, a swarm of midgies and flies joined us and it got so bad we couldn’t keep our eyes open. The flies and midgies were relentless and as more and more joined the party, it became impossible to keep going. So we turned back.

A quarter of an hour after saying goodbye to the boar hunters, we were saying hello to them again. This time walking through the woods, I felt much safer knowing what was going on around us. I also took the time to pay attention to what the hunters were doing. I’d never witnessed a hunt before, but it seemed they were using the dogs to drive out the boar before capturing them.

The afternoon turned out to be one of the most random experiences I’ve had. I may not have made it to the magnificent chateau of Biron, but I did stumble upon a wild boar hunt, something I never thought I’d do. It was a little unnerving when we initially stumbled upon it, but I was fascinated when we discovered what was actually going on. Some of my most memorable travel experiences are those unexpected moments that you couldn’t plan even if you tried, and this afternoon’s adventure turned out to be one of the most unusual.